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Author Topic: Tracks and car recommendations  (Read 6147 times)

wanzo75

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Tracks and car recommendations
« on: Jan 13, 2011, 07:29 am »

please post what car you used and in a and or b spec

Autodromo Nazionale Monza
Tuning Guide: Monza has some gradual inclines
and declines but is overall very flat, so you can
keep your car relatively low. Avoid lots of negative
camber since the bulk of the track focuses on
straight-line acceleration. Downforce will help with
high-speed stability.
Recommended Car: High-powered RWD or AWD.

Autodromo Nazionale Monza
(No Chicane)
Tuning Guide: Aside from the absence of the
first chicane, this track is identical to the regular
Autodromo Nazionale Monza. That said, because
the straightaway is a lot longer without the
chicane, you may need to tweak your gearing to
ensure that you don’t bounce off the limiter. In
addition, downforce is very helpful since you’re
carrying so much speed.
Recommended car: Any RWD or AWD car with
plenty of top-end speed and downforce.

Autumn Ring Mini Forward
Tuning Guide: Since you’ll be hanging around
in second gear a lot, you may want to make this
gear slightly taller so that you have more speed to
work with in the RPM range. Due to the course’s
short length, the highest gear you’ll probably
hit is fourth. That said, simply changing the final
gear means your second gear will become much
shorter, so you’ll want to pay special attention to
third and second gear.
Recommended Car: Any lightweight and nimble
car: FF or FR work well here.

Autumn Ring Forward
Tuning guide: Since this course never gives much
room to gain lots of speed, you’ll want to keep the
gear ratios pretty close. That said, like the Mini
track, you might want to keep the second gear
relatively tall, since so many of the bends have
you hanging around in that gear’s RPM range. A
taller second gear means you won’t have to shift as
often, or bounce off the rev limiter endlessly.
Recommended Car: Nimble, responsive cars—
lightweight MR, FR, or even FF.

Autumn Ring Mini Reverse
Tuning Guide: The setup for your car will be exactly
the same as the forward version of Autumn Ring
Mini. Since you’ll be hanging around in second
gear a lot, you may want to make this gear slightly
taller so that you have more speed to work with
in the RPM range. Due to the short length of this
course, the highest gear you’ll probably hit is
fourth. That said, simply changing the final gear
means your second gear will become much shorter,
so you’ll want to pay special attention to third and
second gear.
Recommended Car: Any light-weight and nimble
car: FF or FR work well here.

Autumn Ring (Reverse)
Tuning Guide: The same tuning rules apply as the Autumn
Ring forward course. This is all about taking the turns with
maximum speed. Lots of negative camber can be helpful
since you’re not braking or accelerating much. You might
want to keep the second gear tall while having the final
gear close, ensuring you don’t bounce off the rev limiter
on the multitude of second-gear turns. On the flip side,
you’ll want to have close gear ratios overall, since you’re
never going to pick up much top end here.
Recommended Car: Lightweight MR cars are ideal for their
balance and responsiveness, though FR or even FF can
work here.

Cape Ring North
Tuning Guide: The northern track has an
assortment of turns, including tight hairpins,
angled bends, and fast sweepers. Thus, your speed
in the corners is very important; there’s not a whole
lot of straight-line acceleration. Keep gear ratios
short to maximize acceleration.
Recommended Car: Nimble MR cars.

Cape Ring South
Tuning Guide: In contrast to the North track,
the South portion of Cape Ring has many more
turns and in general isn’t as fast. So it’s great for
using lots of negative camber. The lack of drastic
elevation changes mean you’re able to use stiffer
suspension settings. And because there’s really
only one short straight section, your gear ratios can
be short.
Recommended Car: Agile, light MR cars.

Cape Ring South
Tuning Guide: In contrast to the North track,
the South portion of Cape Ring has many more
turns and in general isn’t as fast. So it’s great for
using lots of negative camber. The lack of drastic
elevation changes mean you’re able to use stiffer
suspension settings. And because there’s really
only one short straight section, your gear ratios can
be short.
Recommended Car: Agile, light MR cars.

Cape Ring Outside
Tuning Guide: Since the Outside course gets rid
of all the hairpins and sweepers on the inside, it is
the fastest track layout in terms of average speed.
The tuning philosophy will be similar to the full
Cape Ring course, except you’ll want to emphasize
acceleration over other dimensions like camber.
Recommended Car: FR cars with great
acceleration.

Cape Ring
Tuning Guide: The full version is long and arduous,
with a mix everything—from straights to hairpins to
sweepers to chicanes. You’ll need an all-round setup.
The roads are very smooth, and with the exception
of one big jump, there aren’t any bumps or dips in
the pavement. So, use stiffer suspension settings
here. Since the track is more turn-heavy, you can dial
in some negative camber, too.
Recommended Car: High-performance MR or AWD.

Cape Ring Inside
Tuning Guide: The inside track is the shortest of all
the Cape Ring courses, and also the simplest. You
can use very stiff suspension settings here because
it doesn’t have the big jump. Gear ratios should
also be very close to maximize acceleration.
Recommended Car: Agile FR, MR cars.

Chamonix Mini
Tuning Guide: Because of the extremely short
length of the course, it’s doubtful you’ll ever get
above fourth gear. You can use very short gear
ratios for this course, but don’t try making them
so short that you’ll top out in sixth gear. There’s
a certain point where the gears are so short that
you’re hurting acceleration from all the gear
changes.
Recommended Car: Production or rally-racer AWD
cars, with snow tires.

Chamonix East
Tuning Guide: Much of the East track overlaps with
the full course. However, this section never lets you
pile on the speeds of the full course. You’ll want to
have your gear ratios short. Since there’s a lot of
bends and kinks without much braking, negative
camber may be useful here.
Recommended Car: High-powered AWD
production or rally cars.

Chamonix West
Tuning Guide: The longest of the partial sections,
it’s also one of the more technical courses.
Although there’s a long straight, it’s filled with
bumps and imperfections on the road that can
really work your suspension. Therefore, you
want your suspension to be soft. Gear ratios will
be medium-close, and the car may benefit from
downforce to the front and rear.
Recommended Car: High-powered AWD
production or rally cars.

Chamonix
Tuning Guide: In spite of the thick snow, you can
pick up a lot of speed at some of the straighter
sections, even nearing 150 mph. Consequently,
gear ratios should be medium-close, with an
emphasis on acceleration but some room to stretch
past 100 mph. Snow tires are a must for traction.
There are few jumps and bumpy stretches, so you
might get away with stiffer and lower settings than
dirt or gravel courses.
Recommended Car: High-powered AWD
production or rally cars.

Circuit de la Sarthe
Tuning Guide: Since this course is all about speed, you’ll need to optimize
your gearing so that you’re never bouncing off the limiter on those straights.
Set your gearing so that you reach the maximum speed just as you hit each
chicane. That way, you’re not needlessly hurting acceleration by making the
gears too tall. Avoid excessive camber, especially for longer races, or else you’ll
be changing tires more frequently. This track does have its share of little bumps
on the straight, so don’t have a stiff suspension or drop your car really low—
doing either can cause instability at speeds more than 180 mph.
Recommended Car: AWD or RWD cars with high top speeds, high-speed
stability.

Circuit de la Sarthe 2005
(No Chicane)
Tuning Guide: This is the ultimate high-speed test. No other real-life course
comes close to the venerable Mulsanne straight—a seemingly endless
stretch that fries engines and brings suspension components to their
knees. Although the chicane is used for all events now, in the game you can
enjoy more than three miles of unadulerated speed. It comes with a price,
though; bumpy roads and slight kinks can make the difference between a
podium finish and terrible defeat. Suspension settings should be soft, and
ride height raised up—and put lots of downforce front and rear.
Recommended Car: Top-end performance cars, MR or AWD.

Circuit de la Sarthe 2005
Tuning Guide: Given the course’s history of putting
cars to their high-speed limits, this track is all
about extracting the most speed from your car—
and testing its stability. Even with the chicanes
added, you can easily top your rev limiter in your
last gear with some cars. Consequently, you should
tweak the gearing so that you reach your top
speed right as you brake for the first chicane. The
road has a reputation for being rough, especially
on the high-speed Mulsanne straight. Keep your
suspension on the soft side, and don’t drop your
car down too low—bottom out at 200 mph and
terrible things can happen.
Recommended Car: Top-end performance cars,
MR or AWD.

Circuit de la Sarthe 2009
(No Chicane)
Tuning Guide: The Mulsanne straight on Circuit de la Sarthe dwarfs all
other real-world tracks, making the Nürburgring Nordschleife home
straight look like a short track by comparison. Having the right gear ratios
is key here, and you never want to bounce off your rev limiter. If you’re
competing with others, you might even leave extra room with tall gearing,
taking advantage of drafting to catapult your ride to victory. As with the
other Circuit de la Sarthe variants, have a soft suspension setup and a
raised ride height—you’ll especially need it for this version.
Recommended Car: Prodigiously high horsepower cars, typically AWD.

Circuito de Madrid
Tuning Guide: With the track’s long straights, you’ll 8
want a fast-accelerating ride. Because the track
has a lot of straights and hard braking, you don’t
want to have much negative camber here. Turns
tend to be at low speeds, so adjust the suspension
accordingly.
Recommended Car: Fast-accelerating, fast-braking
cars, RWD or AWD.

Circuito de Madrid—
Short Course
Tuning Guide: This course will have even the most
high-end cars going up to 160 mph, so the gear
ratios can be medium-close. Long straights and
heavy braking mean camber isn’t too helpful. The
majority of the course consists of straights, so
adjust downforce for high-speed stability.
Recommended Car: AWD cars can be
advantageous with their great launch and
acceleration.

Circuito de Madrid—Short Course
(Reverse)
Tuning Guide: Like the forward version of the
short, this caters to fast-accelerating cars, but is
less about top speed. Since you’ll never approach
speeds of 200 mph, the gear ratios should be
tweaked to medium-close. Ideally, your car will be
reaching the rev limiter when traversing across the
whole home straight. High-speed stability might
be an issue for the kink past turn 2, so make sure
your setup isn’t prone to heavy understeer.
Recommended Car: AWD cars with an emphasis
on lightness over brute horsepower.

Circuito de Madrid
(Reverse)
Tuning Guide: The tuning philosophy will be the same
here as for the forward course—not lots of negative
camber due to the extensive braking and accelerating
required here. The high speeds are mainly in a straight
line, so you probably don’t need lots of downforce, either.
The track doesn’t extend long enough for really high
speeds—you’re looking at the 160 mph ballpark at most.
So don’t have tall gearing here.
Recommended Car: Well-balanced, high-end MR cars
are ideal. For those on a lower budget, FR cars and AWD
would work, too.

Clubman Stage Route 5
Tuning Guide: Acceleration is the name of the
game for this course. However, the course itself
is short and there won’t be much time spent in
the triple-digit speeds. Keep the gearing shorter,
ensuring that you won’t have lots of RPM left to
hit the limiter at top gear. Downforce will also be
helpful, though with only one big straight you
don’t need to go all out. Since the road is relatively
smooth, you can also have a tighter suspension
setup.
Recommended Car: Fast FR cars tend to be in their
element here.

Clubman Stage Route 5
(Reverse)
Tuning Guide: The reverse version isn’t too
different than the forward, although it may be
slightly easier without having to madly brake
for the complex sweeper in the forward version
of turn 1. There’s a lot of accelerating on this
course, and with the prominent straight, you’ll
want to optimize your gearing so that you max
out in speed right before the initial bend. Since
the corners come in quick succession, tune your
suspension so that it’s very responsive in the quick
transitions. Put some toe-in on the front for a crisp,
initial turn-in, and use stiff sway bars to ensure that
your car responds to your inputs promptly.
Recommended Car: FR cars with an emphasis on
acceleration.

Côte d’Azur
Tuning Guide: Due to windy roads
and strategically placed chicanes,
there’s little opportunity to gain
speed on this course—most cars will
top out at roughly 120 mph. Thus
you’ll want your gear ratios to be very
close to ensure that you maximize
acceleration at the cost of top-end
speed. Low-speed maneuverability
is vital here, and you’ll need to make
sure your car has a crisp turn-in.
Recommended Car: Lightweight,
fast-accelerating MR.

Daytona International Speedway
Tuning Guide: Maximum speed, stability, and downforce are
the key areas to focus on for this track. There’s no braking and
no letting off the gas, so you’ll have a fewer parameters to work
with. Adjusting downforce so that you’re planted to the ground
is essential here, and you’ll want to tweak the balance between
the front and rear so that your car stays relatively neutral
throughout. You could give your car a very slight tendency to
oversteer, thus offsetting the understeer from coming out of a
draft. But your goal here is smooth consistent turns, not drifting.
Recommended Car: Stock cars, any AWD or RWD with high
horsepower.

Daytona Road Course
Tuning Guide: In spite of the infield twists and turns,
this track is still relatively high-speed. Keep the
gearing taller for the final big home stretch. The curves
themselves are mostly taken at moderate to low speeds,
and because of the track’s smoothness, you can get
away with fairly stiff suspension settings.
Recommended Car: High-powered FR, MR, RR, or AWD.

Deep Forest
Tuning Guide: When snaking through dense
forests and navigating blind turns, you’ll need
a balanced suspension setup. If you find the
turn-in responsiveness a bit wanting, put a
bit of toe-in into the tires. For front-wheel
drive cars that have a tendency to understeer
and not respond well to the quick bends,
you can also dial in a small of toe-out to the
rear. Speeds here rarely exceed 160 mph for
any car, so keep the transmission gearing
relatively close.
Recommended Car: Lightweight FF, FR, MR,
or RR cars.

Deep Forest (Reverse)
Tuning Guide: The mid- to lower 100s in the
home straight is the fastest you’ll ever get
on this track. Thus, your gearing should be
pretty close. You’ll be turning a lot without
too much hard braking, so a good amount
of negative camber will also be helpful here.
Many of the curves will have you aggressively
cutting the apexes, some of which are
squarely on a bump or imperfection on the
road. Hence, stiff suspension setups are
anathema here. Adjust the ride height so that
your car won’t be bottoming all the time, too.
Recommended Car: Lightweight FF, FR, MR,
or RR cars.

Eiger Nordwand Short Track
Tuning Guide: Long straights are nonexistent
in this track; thus, you’ll want the gear ratios to
be very close. With the tight turns and the lack
of places to really accelerate, a lot of negative
camber is very helpful here. Since the slowest and
trickiest parts of the course are the descending
switchbacks, you’ll want to be sure your car
doesn’t oversteer excessively down the hills.
Recommended Car: Responsive, quick-turning FF,
FR, MR, or RR.

Eiger Nordwand Short Track
(Reverse)
Tuning Guide: The tuning philosophy for the
reverse version is exactly the same as the
forward. The home straight and the path just
after turn 1 will be the fastest parts of the course,
and even then, you won’t approach 150 mph.
Gear ratios should be close, put lots of negative
camber to the wheels, and put an emphasis
on weight reduction modifications and chassis
rigidity to make your car more agile.
Recommended Car: Agile, responsive FF, FR, MR,
or RR. AWD for the rain.

Eiger Nordwand W Trail
Tuning Guide: As you’d expect, with any dirt
course you’ll want to have a very high ride
height—no slammed cars here. Because of the
slower speeds, gear ratios should be very close,
too. Since these aren’t smooth courses, you’ll also
want a soft suspension setup.
Recommended Car: AWD rally cars or AWD sports
cars (and dirt tires).

Eiger Nordwand K Trail
Tuning Guide: For rally-type tracks, you’ll want
taller ride heights, soft suspension to absorb the
bumps, and close gear ratios. The fastest you’ll go
on this track is about 120 mph. That said, you’ll
want a relatively taller second gear, though, since
you’ll be using that gear heavily when navigating
through a corner.
Recommended Car: Light, high-powered AWD cars
with dirt tires.

Eiger Nordwand G Trail
Tuning Guide: The tuning guides for all of the
Eiger Nordwand dirt tracks are the same; taller
ride heights, soft suspension to absorb the bumps,
and close gear ratios due to the lack of high-speed
straights. You’ll want a relatively taller second gear
though, since that will be your main gear for a lot
of the bends.
Recommended Car: Light, high-powered AWD
cars with dirt tires.

Eiger Nordwand K Trail
(Reverse)
Tuning Guide: The experience going in reverse
is very different from forward, but the tuning
guidelines remain the same. Settings such as
camber and toe shouldn’t be tweaked, but the
shocks and springs should be soft. Also, raise the
ride height to give your suspension more travel,
otherwise you’ll be riding on the suspension’s
bumpstops.
Recommended Car: AWD rally cars, or high-end
AWD cars with dirt tires.

Eiger Nordwand G Trail
(Reverse)
Tuning Guide: Like the K trail and W trail, the
tuning philosophy for the reverse course of the G
trail will be the same. Tune your car for taller ride
heights, soft suspension to absorb the bumps, and
close gear ratios. You could actually use production
cars in lieu of dedicated rally cars here, as long as
they’re AWD.
Recommended Car: Light, high-powered AWD cars
with dirt tires.

Eiger Nordwand W Trail
(Reverse)
Tuning Guide: Unlike the G or K trails, the W trail
is extremely short—and not only that, most of the
time you’re trudging about in first or second gear.
You’ll be lucky to hit 90 mph, and the gear ratios
can be very short. This is particularly useful for
turns that are normally too slow to take in second
gear. The transmission will be the biggest focus—
other than that, make sure you have a high ride
height to prevent bottoming out.
Recommended Car: Production or rally-racer AWD
cars with dirt tires.

Eiger Nordwand W Trail
(Reverse)
Tuning Guide: Unlike the G or K trails, the W trail
is extremely short—and not only that, most of the
time you’re trudging about in first or second gear.
You’ll be lucky to hit 90 mph, and the gear ratios
can be very short. This is particularly useful for
turns that are normally too slow to take in second
gear. The transmission will be the biggest focus—
other than that, make sure you have a high ride
height to prevent bottoming out.
Recommended Car: Production or rally-racer AWD
cars with dirt tires.

Fuji Speedway F
Tuning Guide: There are two more turns in the F course
that aren’t in the GT, but the tuning philosophy doesn’t
really change. A major thrust of the course is the
straight, and you’ll want to tinker with your gear ratios
to ensure that you’re near the rev limit in top gear by
the time you have to hit the brakes for turn 1.
Recommended Car: Quick-accelerating RWD and AWD.

Fuji Speedway GT
Tuning Guide: The home straight that spans for
nearly a mile cannot be ignored. Make the most of
it by tweaking your gear ratios. The track overall
doesn’t have a lot of turns, so focus more on the
acceleration aspect than on tight turning. Keep
suspension settings stiff because the pavement
here is really smooth. Don’t use lots of camber;
put some downforce on the front and rear for
high-speed stability.
Recommended Car: Quick-accelerating FR.

Grand Valley East
Tuning Guide: Given the course’s short
distance, use soft racing tires if the race
doesn’t require a lot of laps. The home
stretch will be the key passing point, so
optimize your gearing so that it’s not
too close. The emphasis here will be
acceleration, not top-end speed.
Recommended Car: Almost any drivetrain
can work here, but preferably FR cars that
can turn on a dime.

Grand Valley Speedway
Tuning Guide: Your tuning rationale should be
very similar to Suzuka; both courses have extended
straights, both have winding chicanes and
sweepers. Avoid lots of camber; make sure your
final gear isn’t so small that you bounce of your rev
limiter in top gear. If you have plenty of room left
in your RPM range at the end of the straight, use
a larger final gear ratio to improve acceleration.
The road isn’t particularly rough and you generally
won’t be riding over the curb much, so stiffer
suspension settings can still work.
Recommended Car: high-end RWD or AWD, with
balanced performance.

Grand Valley East
Reverse
Tuning Guide: The East section is a relatively short,
moderate speed course that’s most notable for its
home straight so you’ll want to use that as your
main advantage. Tweak your final gear so that it’s
just short enough to have your car approach the
rev limiter. Or, another approach is to gain on your
opponents in the twists, focusing instead on your
car’s on responsiveness.

Grand Valley Speedway
(Reverse)
Tuning Guide: The forward and reverse tuning
philosophy is largely the same. That said, the
reverse version of this track tends to have
more turns downhill, so if your car is prone to
oversteer, you may need to make the car more
neutral. Since the track has a balanced mix of
high speeds, tight corners, and fast sweepers,
you’ll need a versatile setup.
Recommended Car: Fast and agile RWD or
AWD, with well-rounded performance.
Recommended Car: Any drivetrain can work here,
but preferably a car with decent acceleration.

High Speed Ring
Tuning Guide: This beginner-friendly track has
you carrying pretty good speed through the
high-speed bends. Use a lot of downforce and keep
your ride height lower to offset lift. Adjust your
gears so that you’re close to hitting the rev limiter
when you reach the home straight. The track is also
pretty smooth, which allows you to keep stiffer
suspension settings.
Recommended Car: High-horsepower FR cars are
really in their element here.

High Speed Ring
(Reverse)
Tuning Guide: The track itself is short, but you’re
doing a lot of accelerating here. The gearing
should be semi-tall, but don’t go overboard—
it’s not likely you’ll be going over 200 mph
here. High-speed stability is vital, so tweak the
downforce settings on your aerodynamic parts. In
addition, you’ll want to minimize drag, so drop the
ride height down low—you won’t be hitting any
rough patches or cutting across chicanes here.
Recommended Car: Fast-accelerating,
high-powered AWD or RWD.

Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Tuning Guide: Because this track has long sweeping
turns, a decent amount of camber can go a long way
toward getting an edge on the curves. Also, since much
of this track will be run in higher gears, you want tall
gearing to ensure you don’t top out your RPMs too
early. Considering the road doesn’t have any erratic
jumps or kinks, you also can get away with a lower ride
height than other tracks, as well as a more aggressive
suspension setup.
Recommended Car: Stock cars, RWD or AWD with a
focus on max speed and acceleration.

Road Course—Indy
Tuning Guide: With the mammoth home straight, high-performance
cars can easily get to speeds exceeding 180 mph. Pile on the power
upgrades to make the most of the long stretch. Also, the smoothness
of the track and the lack of sudden elevation difference mean stiffer
suspension and lower ride heights are favorable.
Recommended Car: RWD or AWD with top-end power.

Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca
Tuning Guide: Since the course doesn’t have very
long straights, medium gearing is optimal here.
Even with a fast-accelerating car, you won’t reach
more than 160 mph on the final straight. Because
of the steep declines and inclines, stay away from
very aggressively tuned suspension setups, as
you’ll find yourself having to constantly wrest
control of your car.
Recommended Car: Nimble and balanced MR, FR,
or AWD.

London
Tuning Guide: Chassis responsiveness is the key
factor to being successful here. If you’re driving
an old jalopy, now might be a good time to fork
over the bucks for a body rigidity upgrade at the
GT Auto Shop. A chassis with play in the frame
reduces the efficiency of the suspension damping
effectively. A little toe in at the front, or stiffer sway
bars can improve initial response into the turn.
Recommended Cars: Maneuverable, lightweight
cars. Zippy FF cars are in their element here.

London (Reverse)
Tuning Guide: Your philosophy in tweaking your
ride will be the same for reverse as the forward
course. Focus on the responsiveness of the car. Since
you’re twisting and turning in rapid succession,
a chassis that’s not rigid will be slow to respond.
Invest in a body rigidity upgrade, or purchase
rigidity parts at the Tuning Shop. There’s very little
elevation change here, so stiffer suspension settings
can work—so long as your car doesn’t get jittery.
Recommended Cars: As for the forward course,
choose cars with high power-to-weight ratio,
typically FF, FR, or MR.

Nürburgring Nordschleife
Tuning Guide: Unfortunately, given the variety
of turns, elevation changes, and speeds of this
course, there’s no easy, “killer” setup for your car.
Your vehicle will have to be good at everything, so
avoid extreme setups. Don’t make the suspension
too stiff, or all the little bumps and divots on the
course will make your car jittery. Don’t drop the car
too low, or else it’ll keep bottoming out, especially
on turns like Karusell. Your car will thank you for
using lots of downforce, especially given how
many turns it must take at high speeds. Adjust
your gearing so that you’ll be able to max out your
speed at the straightaway; if you’re not able to get
to the rev limiter on your last gear, then make the
ratios closer.
Recommended Car: High-end exotic sports cars.
FR and MR can get quick times, but the experience
is a lot easier in AWD.

Nürburgring 24H
Tuning Guide: Since this is essentially a track that
connects the northern loop and the GP/F course, the
tuning guide is the same as for Nordschleife. Refer to
the Nordschleife tuning guide for more details.
Recommended Car: Like Nordschleife, you’ll want
high-end exotic sports cars. FR and MR can get quick
times, but the experience is a lot easier in AWD. In
endurance races tire longevity becomes an issue,
so pick a car you can comfortably drive without
thrashing the tires quickly.

Nürburgring GP/F
Tuning Guide: Although there are elevation
changes, the track is pretty smooth throughout,
and you may be able to get away with stiffer
suspension settings. The course does have its share
of high-speed straightaways, so optimize gearing
so that you’re not bouncing off the rev limiter
(but don’t make them too tall, either). Most turns
are done at moderate speeds, so increasing the
downforce may not yield as much positive result as
on other tracks.
Recommended Car: A powerful all-arounder with
versatile capabilities. RWD or AWD.

Nürburgring GP/D
Tuning Guide: Nürburgring GP/D is a shortened
version of Nürburgring GP/F, and as such, the tuning
principles remain the same. With the heavy braking
and accelerating you’ll be doing on the tarmac, you
won’t want much negative camber. There are many
straight stretches, but none of them gives you a
chance to max out your speed, so gear ratios should
be medium.
Recommended Car: Fast-accelerating RWD or AWD.

Nürburgring Type V
Tuning Guide: Nürburgring Type V combines the
Nürburgring GP/D track with Nordschleife. And
although it’s slightly shorter than the Nürburgring 24H,
the tuning will be the same as all the courses connected
with Nordschleife. There are no quick band-aids you
can use to make your car faster here. It needs to have
everything—high-speed stability, acceleration, tight
turning, responsive brakes, and a great top speed. You
can use slightly stiffer suspension settings, but you’ll
really have to avoid going outside the track.
Recommended Car: High-end sports cars, RWD or AWD.

Rome
Tuning Guide: Due to the turns on inclines and
declines, stiff springs and shocks may make
controlling your car very difficult, especially on
turn 8. Soften the suspension enough to give some
play when going over hills and curbs. Since the
course doesn’t have much room for getting a lot of
speed, gear ratios can be medium-close.
Recommended Car: Fast-accelerating cars with
neutral, high-speed characteristics.

Rome (Reverse)
Tuning Guide: Interestingly, the reverse course
is a lot less stressful than the forward, mainly
because the problematic blind turn isn’t so
intimidating if it’s on an incline going in the other
direction. Therefore, you can tune your shocks
and springs to be stiffer. The course is short and
lacks extended straights, so gear ratios should
be close.
Recommended Car: Fast-accelerating FR or RR
cars—although any drivetrain works fine here.

Special Stage Route 5
Tuning Guide: A significant portion of the
track is the home straight, and you’ll want
to maximize your lap times by making the
higher gears taller. That said, the rest of the
track is full of turns in quick succession, so the
majority of the course is taken pretty slow.
Since many turns are taken at relatively high
speeds, you’ll want to dial in some negative
camber.
Recommended Car: High-performance FR, RR,
MR, or AWD cars.

Special Stage Route 5
(Reverse)
Tuning Guide: Compared to Clubman
Stage Route 5, Special Stage Route 5
adds a couple more turns, but doesn’t
dramatically change how you’d tune
your car. You might want to use more
negative camber since there are many
more tight turns in succession, but know
that it’ll slightly hurt your speed into the
home straight.
Recommended Car: Fast-accelerating FR.

Special Stage Route 7
Tuning Guide: Horsepower and downforce are the
name of the game here. Since the overwhelming
majority of the track is straight, slap on all the
power upgrades that you can and optimize gear
ratios so that you get the best top speed. Because
there are some high-speed bends in the mix, you’ll
want to use lots of downforce to ensure that your
car stays planted on the ground.
Recommended Car: AWD or FR with gobs of
horsepower

Suzuka Circuit East
Tuning Guide: Since the East track is a lot shorter
than the full and doesn’t have long straightaways,
you can use closer gearing. Also, all the turns are
mid- to low-speed, so choose a car (or tune your
current ride) with a setup that tends to be neutral
at speeds of 60 to 70 mph. Because chicanes make
up most of the course, you’ll want a car with a crisp
and responsive turn-in. Rear-engine, rear-wheel
drive cars tend to understeer at the onset and rotate
afterward, making them harder to use especially
tracks as these. If turn-in is numb, put some toe-in at
the front tires. Or, stiffen the front sway bar (which
encourages understeer mid-corner as a side effect),
Recommended Car: Any agile FF, FR, or MR vehicle.

Suzuka Circuit
Tuning Guide: With the extended straight and high-speed turns, you’ll
want for high-speed stability and performance. Adjust your transmission
gearing so that you can accelerate on the straightaway before turn 7 as
fast as you can, but without bouncing off the rev-limiter in top gear. With
the variety of corners and straights, a fairly balanced setup is required
here.
Recommended Car: High-performance RWD or AWD, with an emphasis
on speed.

Top Gear Test Track
Tuning Guide: Since the course is flat, and without any curbs or other bumps to
disrupt your suspension, you can use a stiff suspension setup here. Also, your
car will never pick up a lot of speed because of the course’s small size, which
means you’ll want gearing to be semi-close. Since a lot of turns can be taken at
higher speeds, downforce will be helpful here as well.
Recommended Car: Cars with a mix of high/low-speed handling as well as
acceleration. Mid-engine sports cars tend to excel here.

Tokyo Route 246
Tuning Guide: Aside from the straight at the
beginning of the course, there isn’t much room
to accelerate to full speed, so medium gearing
ratios are sufficient. The track does have minor
dips and climbs, so a very stiff setup could
quickly upset your car balance. Some RWD and
exotics have a tendency to oversteer in the long
sweeping turns out of the factory, so you may
need to stiffen the front sway bar or soften the
rear sway to compensate.
Recommended Car: High-powered AWD cars
with high-speed stability and precise controls.

Tokyo R246
(Reverse)
Tuning Guide: The forward and reverse courses
don’t differ too much, consequently you can use
the forward course tune as-is. Have gearing ratios
set to about medium—not too close, not too tall.
You can clip quite a few apexes on this track, so
avoid ultra-stiff suspension setups.
Recommended Car: Responsive and agile MR, FR,
or RR.

Toscana
Tuning Guide: If you’re not using a dedicated rally
car, you’ll obviously need dirt tires for this track.
Although it is technically possible to do rally races
in a drivetrain other than AWD, the lack of traction
in FWD or RWD makes AWD the clear winner.
Because of the poor traction, you’ll want to set
the torque distribution to be relatively even. Also,
because of the elevation changes and the rough
roads, choose a softer suspension settings, but
also increase the ride height you so won’t quickly
bottom out.
Recommended Car: Any rally car or higher-end
AWD cars with dirt tires.

Toscana (Reverse)
Tuning Guide: The reverse track isn’t substantially
different than the forward, so similar principles
apply here. If you’re using a regular production
AWD car and not a rally car, set the torque
distribution to 50/50, sending power equally to
the front and rear wheels. The roads are rough, so
you’ll need tall ride heights and a softly-sprung
suspension.
Recommended Car: Rally AWD, or high-powered
production AWD with dirt tires.

Trial Mountain
Tuning Guide: Since this is pretty curvy course,
implementing some negative camber could
be a good idea. The rough nature of the track
(especially if you’re planning to cut across the dirt
a lot) means your suspension should be softer than
usual, and the ride height raised. Since turns are on
both inclines and declines, toe should be relatively
neutral, although slight rear toe-out for FWD cars
never hurts.
Recommended Car: A balanced, agile car with the
ability to turn in quickly; FR, MR, or AWD.

Trial Mountain (Reverse)
Tuning Guide: Like the forward course, this is full of
curves, many of which are on inclines and decline.
Since there aren’t long stretches of braking or
accelerating, dialing in negative camber is a good
idea. Depending on the drivetrain and its tendency
to oversteer or understeer, you’ll want to put more
negative camber on the front or rear (more up front
for understeer, more to the rear for oversteer). The
rough bumps and divots mean you need to use a
softer suspension setup.
Recommended Car: Nimble FF, FR, or MR.

Tsukuba Circuit
Tuning Guide: Due to the course’s short length,
tight turns, and the constant-radius, high-speed
turns, this is a great place to tune your car’s
suspension and handling. Although elevation
changes are minor, you’ll be riding over the curbs
on the chicanes, so you can’t get too stiff. Also,
because the course lacks extended straights,
or prolonged braking, you can use a lot more
negative camber here than other tracks. When
competing, pick lighter, more nimble cars rather
than those with brute power.
Recommended Car: Any lightweight,
maneuverable car—FF, FR, RR, or AWD.

this is from a book hope it helps
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CLSAMG

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Re: Tracks and car recommendations
« Reply #1 on: Feb 02, 2011, 12:45 pm »

WOW !!  :shock:
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mmjjee

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Re: Tracks and car recommendations
« Reply #2 on: Feb 12, 2011, 02:58 am »

WOW!! in deed...
THE BIGGEST POST EVER!! :D  :D
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henbone11

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Re: Tracks and car recommendations
« Reply #3 on: Feb 13, 2011, 05:05 am »

Quote from: "mmjjee"
WOW!! in deed...
THE BIGGEST POST EVER!! :D  :D

and you are just seeing this?  did it take you becoming a mod to be able to access all areas of the forum?
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mmjjee

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Re: Tracks and car recommendations
« Reply #4 on: Feb 13, 2011, 08:23 pm »

Quote from: "henbone11"
Quote from: "mmjjee"
WOW!! in deed...
THE BIGGEST POST EVER!! :D  :D

and you are just seeing this?  did it take you becoming a mod to be able to access all areas of the forum?
well to be honest with, i have read this post several times but i have only just decided to comment on it. Is that a problem with you?
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Bruggenwirth

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Re: Tracks and car recommendations
« Reply #5 on: Feb 14, 2011, 04:08 am »

Quote from: "mmjjee"
Quote from: "henbone11"
Quote from: "mmjjee"
WOW!! in deed...
THE BIGGEST POST EVER!! :D  :D

and you are just seeing this?  did it take you becoming a mod to be able to access all areas of the forum?
well to be honest with, i have read this post several times but i have only just decided to comment on it. Is that a problem with you?

Rawr Cat-fight!! Guys, chill it's just a forum. No need for this! Peace for all!

AndyT

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Re: Tracks and car recommendations
« Reply #6 on: Feb 14, 2011, 08:24 am »

Bruggen, open the box with your special cookies in it dude, pass them around...  :mrgreen:
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Bruggenwirth

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Re: Tracks and car recommendations
« Reply #7 on: Feb 15, 2011, 03:56 am »

Quote from: "AndyT"
Bruggen, open the box with your special cookies in it dude, pass them around...  :mrgreen:

OMG! Andy.. you knew it right?! In any other forum.. I'm actually know as "Cookie"... Very strange and scary stuff Andy, very scary!

mpumi

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Re: Tracks and car recommendations
« Reply #8 on: Jul 13, 2012, 05:48 am »

Good literature, though maybe narrowing it down to the tough circuits 1st might do the trick. Though hey just a suggestion, would be good to have this....have seen one other post on the best car and opponent car to look for for all circuits as well
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